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5 Things You Should Never do With a DOBERMAN

From their obedience and self-control, to their approachableness and stress levels, there’s a few KEY things owners should never do with a Doberman.

Let’s run through those points so your Doberman can grow into a well-rounded dog.

5 Things Never To Do With a Doberman

not to do with doberman

If owners ensure they don’t do the following with their Doberman, their Dobie will be happier, less anxious, and will have greater self discipline.

1. NOT giving them a task/challenge to perform

Dobermans absolutely need their minds put to work in order to be satisfied on a daily basis.

Without giving them a proper job to do, they won’t know where to channel their mental energy, and in most cases the result is anxiety, frustration, hightened stress, and bad behavior.

Dobermans are so switched on that they MUST have something to occupy them.

As the owner, this means giving them puzzle toys, nose work games, training, and plenty of socialization.

You might find my article on Doberman Mental Stimulation helpful.

2. NOT starting socialization practices EARLY

Sorry, but we’ve got to jump on the “socialization” bandwagon here. And for very good reasons!

It may have been something you’ve heard time and time again, but socialization is crucial for your Doberman to remain calm (though still alert) in the presence of strangers and other dogs.

Being one of world’s best guard dogs requires them to be suscipisious, but this can lead to serious outbursts of aggressiveness if they are not used to being around new people.

Owners MUST introduce their young Doberman to as many new dogs and strangers as possible right away.

This teaches your Doberman basic social etiqutte and prevents them from becoming overly anxious (and thus aggressive) whenever around someone or something new.

Neglecting a Doberman’s socialization will lead them to be overly protective, suspicious and anxious should they encounter ANYONE that isn’t you (including friends and family).

3. NOT paying them enough attention

Although our dog’s can’t demand ALL of our attention, dobermans certainly are not a breed that can go all day without their owners focus and time.

As many state, Dobermans are not for the “casual” dog owner. And they will not be okay being left to their own devices for extended periods of time.

Dobermans are highly intune with their owners and they need their owners to be the same with them (to a reasonable level).

This means owners need to interact and engage with their Doberman pretty consistently throughout the day in order for them to remain calm, content and anxiety-free.

4. NOT developing a proper exercise routine

Dobermans are a highly energetic breed are require sufficient physical exercise to keep them fit, healthy and agile.

But it’s not just the amount of exercise that owners need to get right (which is about 90 minutes at least per day), it’s also about WHEN you exercise your Dobie.

Studies show that most owners around the world only exercise their dogs once per day, which is in the afternoon or late evening.

Don’t do that with a Doberman. It’s so much better to break up your Dobermans exercise to twice per day, 45 minutes FIRST thing in the morning, and another 45 session later in the day.

Giving them exercise first thing in the morning will expend pent up energy, reduce nerves, and give them a calmer demeanour to start the day.

Neglecting early morning exercise is the quickest way to bad behavior, frustration, and highetened stress.

5. NOT asserting yourself as the clear leader

Big mistake. Owners who don’t make it clear to their Doberman that they are the alpha (boss) of the household, will run into a myriad of problems.

From disobedience and not following commands, to bad and uncontrollable behavior, it’s not something you want with such a large and strong dog.

Part of owning a Doberman comes with a responsibility of being in control of them. For obvious reasons.

To be a good leader, owners must be proactive with the following:

  • Early command training (given daily)
  • Setting rules and boundaries (that are always followed)
  • Being calm and sensible (Dobermans respect a calm leader)
  • Giving plenty of positive reinforcement training (Showing your Doberman what’s right)
  • Correcting bad behavior as soon as it happens (Bad behavior must be corrected when you catch them in the act. Dogs do not understand lessons about doing something wrong after-the-fact .) My article about disciplining Dobermans correctly.
  • Being firm, but also readily available to give and receive affection
  • Sticking a routine for exercise, feeding, training, playing etc (Dobermans are much calmer and more content when they know what is happening and when it’s happening)

Key Points Summarized

In order to raise a calm, happy, and obedient Doberman, owners must focus on the following:

  • Provide sufficient mental stimulation on a daily basis
  • Provide consistent socialization from as young as possible
  • Pay enough attention and avoid leaving them alone for prolonged periods
  • Exercise first thing in the morning AND in the evening
  • Be a calm, assertive, and reliable leader
  • Correct behavior in a positive way the moment it happens
  • Set rules and boundaries and never blur the lines between what’s accepted and what isn’t. (Dobermans lose respect for unclear leaders)

Last thoughts

We hope this article provided extra insight into raising a Doberman to be obedient, calm, and generally well-rounded.

Dobermans are not the easiest breed to own, so we would love to hear your tips and advice on this! Use the contact page to send us a message.

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Disclaimer

Before making any decisions that could affect the health and/or safety of your dog, you should always consult a trained veterinarian in your local area. Even though this content may have been written/reviewed by a trained veterinarian, our advice to you is to always consult your own local veterinarian in person. For the FULL disclaimer Visit Here


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